Posts Tagged ‘symbols’

Symbols

Symbols

 

1. \in (Belongs to)

 

2. \notin (Does not belongs to)

 

3. :or (Such that)

 

4. < (Less than)

5. > (Greater than)

 

6. \Lambda (And)

 

7. V (or)

 

8. \forall (For every or For all)

 

9. \Rightarrow (Implies that)

 

10. \Leftarrow (Is implied by)

 

11. \Leftrightarrow (If and only if) or (Implies and is implied by)

 

12. \subseteq (Is a subset of)

 

13. \nsubseteq (Is not a subset of)

 

14. \supset (Is a super set of or Is contains)

 

15. \subset (Is a proper subset of or Is contained in)
 

16. ⊄   (Is not a proper subset of or, Is not contained in)

 

17. \exists (There exist)

 
18. \cup (Union of sets)

 

19. \cap (Intersection of sets)
 

20. U  (universal set )
 

21.   \cong Congruent

 

 

Use inequality symbols

Use inequality symbols

 

The statement 4 + 2 = 6 is

an equation; it states that two quantities are equal. The statement 4 ≠ 6

(read “4 is not equal to 6”) is an inequality, a statement that two quantities

are not equal. When two numbers are not equal, one must be less than the

other. The symbol <  means “is less than.” For example,

8 < 9, -6 <, 15, -6 < – 1, and 0 < \frac{4}{3} .

The symbol >  means “is greater than.” For example,

12 > 5, 9 > -2, and \frac{6}{5} > 0 .

In each case, the symbol “points” toward the smaller number.